Tuesday, February 10, 2015

Annals of Dhimmitude: New York Times Celebrates Early America’s ‘Islamic Roots’

Posted By Michael Walsh On February 10, 2015 @ 6:11 am In Politics,Religion | 5 Comments

If you ever doubted for a moment that the Gray Lady has become a crack whore for the Obama administration, put your doubts aside:
Scheduled to deliver an invocation at the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo last week, Moujahed Bakhach of the local Islamic Association of Tarrant County canceled his appearance because of the backlash brought on by a prayer he had offered a few days before. The imam had been asked to confer a blessing on horses, riders and members of the military. He was met with gasps from the audience and social media complaints: “Outraged at a Muslim prayer at an all American event!” “Cowboys don’t want it!” 
Vocal anti-Islamic sentiment is undergoing a revival. Four days before the imam’s canceled benediction, protesters at the State Capitol in Austin shouted down Muslim speakers, claiming Texas in the name of Jesus alone. In North Carolina two weeks earlier, Duke University’s plan to broadcast a Muslim call to prayer was abandoned amid threats of violence. Meanwhile Gov. Bobby Jindal, Republican of Louisiana claimed that if American Muslims “want to set up their own culture and values, that’s not immigration, that’s really invasion.”
Jindal, of course, is right: it is an invasion, consciously orchestrated by the Saudis and abetted by the Muslim sympathizer in the White House. Naturally, the Times can’t let such truth-telling stand, and so — carrying Obama’s water, as usual — it comes up with this apologia:
No matter how anxious people may be about Islam, the notion of a Muslim invasion of this majority Christian country has no basis in fact. Moreover, there is an inconvenient footnote to the assertion that Islam is anti-American: Muslims arrived here before the founding of the United States — not just a few, but thousands. 
They have been largely overlooked because they were not free to practice their faith. They were not free themselves and so they were for the most part unable to leave records of their beliefs. They left just enough to confirm that Islam in America is not an immigrant religion lately making itself known, but a tradition with deep roots here, despite being among the most suppressed in the nation’s history.
Oh, for God’s sake: seeing conspiracies everywhere, the modern anti-American Left now simply asserts as fact something that is prima facie risible — in this case, that Muslims have had any meaningful role in the foundation of the United States of America. After citing a couple of examples of possibly Muslim slaves among the human cargo in the South, the writer, Peter Manseau, goes on to claim:
The story of Islam in early America is not merely one of isolated individuals. An estimated 20 percent of enslaved Africans were Muslims, and many sought to recreate the communities they had known. In Georgia, which has joined more than a dozen states in the political theater of debating a restriction on judges’ consulting Shariah, Muslims on a secluded plantation are known to have lived under the guidance of a religious leader who wrote a manuscript on Islamic law so that traditional knowledge might survive… 
Islam is part of our common history — a resilient faith not just of the enslaved, but of Arab immigrants in the late 19th century, and in the 20th century of many African-Americans reclaiming and remaking it as their own. For generations, its adherents have straddled a nation that jolts from promises of religious freedom to events that give the lie to those promises. 
In a sense, Islam is as American as the rodeo. It, too, was imported, but is now undeniably part of the culture. Whether or not protesters in Texas and elsewhere are ready for it, it is inevitable that some Muslims will let their babies grow up to be cowboys. A few cowboys may grow up to be Muslims as well.
Remember: they never stop, they never sleep, they never quit.

Article printed from The PJ Tatler: http://pjmedia.com/tatler

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